Category Archives: ELT activities for teenagers

Ideas to make the teaching/learning of writing more enjoyable

Teach me_Writing (1)

Productive skills like writing can be hard to deal with not only for students but also for teachers. Learning how to write can become a nuisance for students unless we, teachers, make it a more interactive and entertaining activity. The odds are that if we get bored when teaching writing, so will our students when trying to learn it.  So why not working around that to make it an enjoyable experience for all?

There are a lot of alternative ways to teach writing rather than just making students read a sample model with some notes on what to do and what not to do before letting them venture on their own pieces. The idea is to provide some kind of scaffolding first until our students become more confident and are able to write on their own and within a fixed time limit – in the case of exam preparation. Having said this, let’s have a look at some fun but productive activities we can implement with our students when dealing with writing.

1. The first and most widespread approach is reading the task and brainstorming ideas as a whole-class activity before starting to write. Some students have difficulties coming up with ideas and this gets worse when they are under pressure due to time limit guidelines. They will have to get to used it, of course, but on the initial stages we can make them feel more at ease by pulling ideas together before making them write a piece from scratch by themselves. When brainstorming, content is important but so is layout which, needless to say, is different for each type of writing. We shouldn’t disregard this last aspect and we must, therefore, work together on the distribution of paragraphs and writing structure in general.

Once the skeleton is ready, we can provide students with a list of useful linkers and connectors, among others, so that they can join ideas and avoid a choppy style or, even worse, an kind of undesired “stream-of-consciousness” technique. And this, in turn, reminds me of the importance of punctuation, which we shouldn’t take for granted either. Only after we have dealt with this preliminary issues we can proceed to either divide students into pairs making them write a piece together or letting them write on their own, depending on how confident they feel about it.

2. Another useful and fun approach to the teaching of writing is whole-class correction of writing samples. There are many samples provided in books and online so we can then choose a sample and do two things:

  • Work with a printed copy of the writing sample so while they work together on trying to find the mistakes they make those corrections in their copies, too.
  • Project it on the interactive board – if you have one – and make students volunteer to stand up and make the corrections on the interactive board with the e-pen.

We can even turn any of the two ideas into a game which we can call “Mistake Hunters”. We can divide the class into different teams and assign each group a certain type of mistake to find; namely, spelling, grammar, choice of vocabulary, style, punctuation, etc. When they come to the board to make the corrections they can choose different colours to show each correction belongs to a different mistake category.  I am a strong supporter of this kind of activity because it has proved useful at least for the groups I’ve taught; they have great fun and they learn how to improve writing pieces at the same time. It’s worth the try.

3. Still another engaging activity to get the adrenaline going is working on group writing in innovative ways. For instance, we can divide the class into groups and make them work on the layout and brainstorming together and then do two things:

  • Either make each of the members of the groups work on a different paragraph of the piece during a certain amount of time
  • Or set an overall time limit for the writing task, let’s say, 20-25 minutes, and tell each group to start writing and go on doing so until a bell rings or an alarm goes off, in which case they will have to pass the piece of paper to the next member of the group and he/she will have to start writing to continue with the idea his/her partner has started and keep developing the topic even further

In both cases, since they have worked on the planning stage together, the writing process should be easier because they just have to develop the ideas they have brainstormed.

These ideas are intended to be done with pre intermediate groups and above. However, I am sure you can also adapt some of them for lower levels and make the most of them with your students.

The important thing here is to move away from more traditional approaches to the teaching of writing and start engaging our students in more innovative –  though not less productive –  ways of doing it. Trust me, it’s worth the try!

Picture 2.jpg

(Image 2 credits: “Why is a raven like a writing desk text” by Barbara, Flickr.com, Creative Commons)

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Filed under ELT activities for teenagers, Motivation, Teaching Writing Skills, Uncategorized

A “keep talking” activity

Jobs

I’m the teacher of this group of pre-FCE level students who are very enthusiastic about their English lessons. Once, we were dealing with a speaking activity about “jobs” and as a warm-up activity they had to match a set of questions with their answers. The questions were: “What do you do?”, “What’s a typical day in your job?” and “What do you like most about your job?”, among others. The focus was on using specific vocabulary for different professions/occupations and typical verbs to describe the duties and responsibilities related to those jobs.

To my surprise, they really enjoyed doing that activity so, on the spot, I assigned some other jobs for each of them to talk about based on their parents’. They had so much fun that I decided I had to take advantage of their interest and think of something else. And that is how I came up with the idea of preparing a PowerPoint presentation with images of different and unusual professions together with images about what those jobs involve so that they would keep on talking for as long as the presentation for that job lasted.

My intention was to recycle the vocabulary and expressions they already know (I’m in charge of, my job involves + “ing”, I’m responsible for + noun/-ing form, I’m involved in…) but to introduce new words as well, depending on the job shown on the presentation.

This is a language-generating activity that also aims at contributing to students’ fluency. As you change slides, they have to think of specific verbs to use with the nouns and phrases shown. The teacher should wait until they have finished describing each slide in order to move on to the next; the students are the ones that will set the pace of the activity as they describe the slides. To round off the activity there is a gag at the end that students can also describe.

As a teacher, you can plan ahead which jobs you want to deal with and make your own presentations with text and images of your choice. You will see how interest-grabbing this activity can be. Here’s an example of one of the jobs we’ve worked with: Speaking task_Pre FCE

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Filed under ELT activities for teenagers, Materials design

Designing my own material: Have I gone mad?

Designing materials

How good are you at designing your own teaching material? Are you always on the lookout for new ideas or resources that you can later modify and turn them into feasible lesson plans?

I am one of those, in fact. That is, every time I’m watching a movie or a TV series, reading authentic materials I got on my last holidays or even when someone posts a picture with a text in English I cannot help thinking about how to exploit them in my lessons with my students. To illustrate this at work, here’s my latest example.

I was just browsing through my facebook newsfeed when all of sudden I came across this video about two of the most important universities in the UK Oxford vs. Cambridge

The moment I started watching it, I realized I would be using it in my lessons since the content is educational and it is presented in a very innovative and catching way. As you may have seen if you watched the video, it is a point by point description of relevant facts to show which university has achieved the highest number of things or the most successful ones throughout their existence, only to arrive to the conclusion that both are equally important and there is no such thing as a winner.

I spent some time thinking of possible activities to be used with this video until I came up with one which was the following one:

Title: The War of the Titans

Possible objectives? Well, lots of them:

  • To introduce CLIL to my lessons
  • To make students work in pairs on a CLIL project
  • To combine learning English with fun activities
  • To make students work with technological resources (Power Point docs, video making programs, screen capture softwares, projectors)
  • To involve students with their own learning by engaging them in research to find relevant content (and of their own choice) to make their own videos.

Here’s a detailed student’s worksheet:The War of the Titans_Students’ worksheets

Note that this activity was intended to be done with intermediate and upper-intermediate students to give them more freedom about what to say. However, I bet you can adapt it to lower levels as well since the difficulty here lies on how well they manage to use the resources involved. The technological resources used are: mobile phones, tablets, laptops, search engines, PowerPoint, aTube Catcher (for screen capture) and a projector.

Other factors to consider

It’s worth mentioning that if your students are not tech-savvy or if they don’t have mobiles or any other of the resources mentioned before then you should consider using this activity in a more traditional way. One alternative would be to make them look for useful information and just distribute it as a pair so that each member of the pair reads his/her part. You would be working with content all the same and it would still be a game.

So, if while talking to other colleagues about materials design they seem to suggest that you are mad because you waste time creating your own material when there are so many ready-to-use resources, then you can come up with what I call a witticism,

Hatter, “Have I gone mad?”

Alice, “I’m afraid so; you’re entirely bonkers. But I’ll tell you a secret: all the best people are.”

Alice in Wonderland. Watch it, here.
Source: Film: Alice in Wonderland, 2010. Directed by Tim Burton and written by Linda Woolverton

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Filed under ELT, ELT activities for teenagers, Materials design, Teaching with technology